Rep. Markwayne Mullin Moves on to OK’s GOP Senate Primary Runoff to Rep. Inhofe

Rep. Markwayne Mullin (R-OK) on Tuesday evening advanced to Oklahoma’s Republican Senate primary runoff on August 23 to replace retiring Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-OK).

Mullin reached the runoff with about 45 percent of the vote, according to the New York Times. T.W., former Oklahoma House Speaker, is in second place. Shannon with 17 percent of the vote. Mullin needed to win 50 percent of the vote to avoid a runoff with Shannon, who is leading third-place finisher Nathan Dahm by about six percent or 17,000 votes.

The winner of the likely runoff will face off against Kendra Horn, who served in Congress from 2019 to 2021. Horn lost to Rep. Stephanie Bice (R-OK) in her reelection campaign in 2020 by about five percentage points or 13,000 votes. Horn had previously flipped a +11 red district to claim the seat in the 2018 midterms.

Mullin declared his campaign in February. He gave up his House seat to run for the open seat in the Senate. Mullin is a lifetime member of the NRA and opposes abortion, according to his website. Mullin supports the construction of the southern border wall, and has pledged his support for America First.

“Markwayne Mullin supports President Trump and is opposed to the liberal socialist policies Nancy Pelosi has adopted,” his website states.

Mullin focused her successful campaign on fighting culture wars and protecting the Second Amendment. During the campaign, Mullin issued an ad, “What a woman is,” highlighting Penn State swimmer Lia Thomas and transgender athletes in American sports.

Mullin has six children and is married. He also owns a plumbing business.

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Follow Wendell Husebo on Twitter and Gettr @WendellHusebo. He is the author of Politics of Slave Morality.

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